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9th Health Services and Policy Research Conference

Workshops

Pre-Conference Indigenous Workshop: Sharing successes, strengths and staying strong

9.30am-5.00pm Sunday 6 December, 2015

The HSRAANZ Indigenous workshop will bring together international Indigenous researchers to share success stories and discuss emerging platforms to support Indigenous health service research and empower communities. The workshop will help identify research strategies to improve Indigenous research capacity into the future.

The workshop will be held at the Lowitja Institute in a space designed by an Aboriginal architect. There will be opportunities to learn about the Aboriginal community in Victoria throughout the day. At the end of the day there will be an excursion to Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at the Melbourne Museum to visit the first peoples exhibition.

Venue: Lowitja 100 Drummond St, Carlton Victoria http://www.lowitja.org.au

Program

9.30am-10.00am Arrival and Morning Tea
10.00am – 10.30am Welcome to Country and Introductions
10.30am – 11.15am Developing platforms to support health services research - Mary Guthrie Lowitja Institute
11.15am – 12.00pm NPY Women’s Council Ngangkari Program (30min presentation +15 mins discussion)- Pantjiti McKenzie, Docker River community, NT; Maringka Burton, Iwantja community, SA; Interpreter: Linda Rive
12.00pm – 1.00pm Lunch
1.00pm – 3.00pm Success stories in Indigenous health services research
1.00pm - Terori Hareko-Samios
1.30pm - Melody Ninomiya
2.00pm - Amohia Boulton
2.30pm - General discussion
3.00pm Workshop Concludes
3.30pm Optional tour of Bunjilaka at the Melbourne Museum

Breakfast: Early Career Fellowship Funding: Life after your higher degree: tips and tricks to getting fellowship funding

7.00am-8.15am Tuesday 8 December, 2015

Cost: $35. Includes light breakfast.

There is an increasing recognition that securing funding for a postdoctoral career in research is even harder than completing the PhD (or its equivalent) itself. There are a number of schemes that offer postdoctoral salary support but getting funding through these schemes is becoming harder. This workshop will discuss tips and tricks to getting early career fellowship funding with a focus on NHMRC funding and a discussion of other sources eg The Heart Foundation and Australian Research Council. Speakers include those with current NHMRC Early Career and Career Development Fellowships as well as those who have been members of the Early Career Fellowship panel for NHMRC. This workshop is suited to those completing their PhD as well as those embarking on their postdoctoral research career. Practical tips for structuring career pathways and for completing the applications will be discussed.

Presenters

Dr Emma Sciberras, psychologist and ECF holder
A/Professor Lisa Gold, health economist and ECF holder
Dr Jon Quach, DECRA (ARC) fellowship holder
A/Professor Harriet Hiscock, paediatrician and CDF (level 2) holder and former chair, NHMRC Population Health ECF Panel

Breakfast: Chronic disease prevention: data, policy and practice

7.00am-8.15am Tuesday 8 December, 2015

Cost: $35. Includes light breakfast.

This breakfast seminar will look at the population health and other data related to chronic diseases and their risk factors, and how this information can be used to influence policy and practice. The connection between what we know—from research and data—and policy, is often not direct or clear. The seminar will look at how data, targets and indicators can be used to better hold governments to account for better policy. The discussion will use Australia’s progress with regard to World Health Organization (WHO) Noncommunicable Disease goals and targets as a starting point, and focus at initiatives that relate to these international policy directions. The approach will be to highlight the challenge from three aspects/ vantage points of presenters: epidemiology (data source); advocate (data user); and policy maker (data avoider ;-) As befits the hour, the presentations will be informal, and a healthy breakfast will be provided.

Presenters

Professor Maximillian de Courten, Director, Centre for Chronic Disease, Victoria University

Prof de Courten is a global public health expert with substantial experience in interventions ranging from the pathophysiology of non-communicable diseases to translation of this research into population-based approaches. His research focus is Global Health and disease surveillance in the area of chronic diseases. He has worked in a range of different organizations, such as large governmental research institutes (the NIH in the US), inter- governmental institutions (WHO), private research institutions and academia (University of Copenhagen – most recently - Monash and Deakin University, University of Bern).

Rosemary Calder, Advocate, Affiliation: Director, Australian Health Policy Collaboration

Rosemary Calder AM is a respected health and social policy advisor and previously worked as Health Policy Director at the Mitchell Institute, and for State and Commonwealth governments. She has experience as a senior public servant for both the Coalition and Labor governments. Rosemary was head of the Office for the Status of Women, under the Howard Government and Chief of Staff to a former Victorian Minister for Health

Rob Knowles

Hon Rob Knowles AO was Victorian Minister for Health from 1996 until 1999 and MLC for Ballarat from 1976-1999. He has also served as Chairman of Food Standards Australia and New Zealand; as a member of the National Health & Hospital Reform Commission and as a former Aged Care Complaints Commissioner. He is currently Chairman of the Mental Health Council of Australia, Chairman of Campus Council at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, a Director of Silver Chain / RDNS South Australia; a member of the Deans External Advisory Council for the Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences & Nursing at the University of Melbourne and Chair of the Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Proudly sponsored by Victoria University

Breakfast: Designing economic evaluation alongside clinical studies

7.00am-8.15am Wednesday 9 December, 2015

Cost: $35. Includes light breakfast.

This seminar will provide an overview of cost effectiveness analysis and examples of economic evaluations that have been conducted of trials. Practical information on methods for prospectively collecting costs and outcomes data through administrative data linkage and patient surveys will be provided. It will also explain the techniques used to analyse economic data and illustrate this through examples. Issues covered in this course include: an introduction to economic evaluation alongside clinical studies, analysing health economic data, methods to assess quality of life and input of clinical outcomes in cost-effectiveness analysis, extrapolation, modelling and capturing uncertainty, collecting relevant cost data and economic evaluation reporting standards.

Presenter

Professor Philip Clarke, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne

Professor Philip Clarke joined the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne in February 2012 as the Chair in Health Economics. Previously, Prof Clarke was the A/Prof at the Sydney School of Public Health. Prof Clarke previously spent six years engaged in health economic research at the University of Oxford. His research in Oxford focused on the economic analysis of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) - a landmark trial of policies to improve the management of people with Type 2 diabetes. His health economic research interests include developing methods to value the benefits of improving access to health care, health inequalities and the use of simulation models in health economic evaluation. He has also undertaken policy relevant research for the World Bank, OECD, AusAID and DoHA. He has over 80 peered review publications and has recently contributed to books on cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis published by Oxford University Press. http://www.findanexpert.unimelb.edu.au/display/person443785

Workshop 1: How do we monitor hospital-acquired harm?

2.00pm-5.00pm Wednesday 9 December, 2015

Cost: $50 for HSRAANZ 2015 delegates; $125 for non-delegates

There is no consensus about the most useful way to identify and classify adverse events in hospital care: indicators vs comprehensive measures, preventable vs all, process vs outcomes, bedside vs external reporters. Internationally, the most common method for identifying adverse events is voluntary reporting by frontline staff, although more recently, patient-reported adverse outcomes, and use of routinely coded data have been advocated.

This workshop provides an overview of international systems of classification for adverse outcomes of hospital inpatient care, with an emphasis on the Australian Classification of Hospital-Acquired Diagnoses (CHADx). It includes a demonstration of a new online benchmarking portal developed at Northern Health in Melbourne to enable hospitals using CHADx to compare their patterns and rates with comparable Victorian hospitals. The factors that enable ‘productive’ monitoring of harm – that is, so that monitoring supports on-going improvement activity, will be explored.

Presenters

Assoc. Professor Terri Jackson, Northern Health, University of Melbourne

Biography

Assoc. Professor Christine Jorm, Sydney University Medical School

Biography

Dr Peter D McNair, Clinical epidemiologist, Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute

Biography

Workshop 2: Planning and commissioning systematic reviews to inform policy

2.00pm-5.00pm Wednesday 9 December, 2015

Cost: $50 for HSRAANZ 2015 delegates; $125 for non-delegates

This workshop will introduce participants to the essentials of planning and commissioning high quality systematic reviews designed to address policy questions. Examples will be drawn from reviews evaluating the effects of complex interventions used to deliver and improve health services.

The workshop will provide an introduction to the following:

  1. Determining the type of review: comprehensive systematic review, overview of reviews, rapid review, scoping review.
  2. Specifying methods
    • Formulating answerable questions: review scope and questions
    • Search methods and scope: ensuring key research is located
    • Quality of the evidence: assessing systematic reviews, primary studies and the body of evidence
    • Data presentation and synthesis: making best use of available data and ensuring valid findings
    • Applicability of the evidence: ensuring findings are relevant to your question and context
    • Reporting and summary formats: clear and efficient presentation of review findings
  3. Checking the final review: tools to assess the quality of reporting and trustworthiness of findings.

Presenters

Sue Brennan, Research Fellow, Australasian Cochrane Centre

Biography

Sally Green, Co-Director and Professorial Fellow, Australasian Cochrane Centre

Biography

Joanne McKenzie, Senior Research Fellow,Australasian Cochrane Centre

Biography

Steve McDonald, Co-Director, Australasian Cochrane Centre

Biography

Workshop 3: Researching the health workforce

2.00pm-5.00pm Wednesday 9 December, 2015

Cost: $50 for HSRAANZ 2015 delegates; $125 for non-delegates

The health workforce is central to improving population health, efficiency, and equity in the provision of health care. Given considerable practice variations, low value care and overdiagnosis, a focus on the health workforce is essential to improve the health care system. The aim of this workshop is to encourage research on the health workforce by: i) outlining key policy issues and research questions, and, ii) providing information on existing health workforce datasets that can be used in research. Short presentations by a mix of policy makers, data custodians, and researchers will be followed by questions and discussion.

Workshop Objectives:

Presenters

Lead Presenter - Professor Anthony Scott, The University of Melbourne

Tony is a health economist who leads the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Medical Workforce Dynamics which runs the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) longitudinal survey of 10,000 doctors.

Stephen Duckett, Grattan Institute
Dean Raven, Department of Health (Victoria)
Maureen McCarty, Australian Government Department of Health
Tammy Taylor, University of Melbourne
Caroline Laurence, University of Adelaide
Christine Duffield, UTS
Matthew McGrail, Monash University